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ColorVision Spyder2Pro
by Datacolor
Monitor Calibration (Part 2)
December 17, 2006
Spyder2PRO Introduction What's In The Box / Closer Look
Spyder2PRO Monitor Calibration Monitor Calibration (Part 2) Monitor Calibration (Part 3)
Spyder2PRO PrintFIX PLUS Spyder2PRO Specifications Spyder2PRO Conclusion



ColorVision Spyder2Pro
Dynamic Range: Black point: 0.02 cd/m2
Dynamic Range: White point: > 5,000 cd/m2
Interface: USB data and power supply
Weight: 175g (6.1 oz) (including counterweight, LCD baffle, and USB cable)
Warranty: 2-year hardware warranty
MSRP: $279.00 | Click For Best Price
Most users probably won't investigate into setting their own gammas, curves, color temps, and so on, as Spyder2PRO has the standard selections already built-in to their Spyder2PRO software. However, there are situations where you may want to change the settings. In the Pro version of Spyder software, you can change many different settings. If you're a novice at this, I still suggest purchasing the Spyder2PRO package as you will eventually become familiar with the settings and will probably venture out and experiment with your own. There also may be times when a special calibration is necessary for a particular project as well, and it's just nice to be aware you have the professional version which can take on such a project.

Choose Your Gamma

Here you can choose from a selection of pre-defined gamma levels, or you can enter in your own numbers by selecting Other. The higher the gamma level, the more contrast and higher color saturation your monitor's display will have. Why use a gamma of 2.2? Well, it is currently considered the sweet spot. And I do emphasize currently as color profiles will change over time. Not to get too off track, but film users are probably used to a much higher gamma, which explains some reluctance of film camera users to go digital because their "colors change". You see, when a subject has more or less light on it, the subject will inherit more or less of the color saturation. A lower gamma number basically means colors will be much lighter (too the point of being washed out for example at gamma 1.0) and a higher gamma number means colors will be much more saturated (such as gamma 2.5).

Another factor to be taken into account with gamma numbers, is shadow highlights. Higher gamma numbers mean you will not see as much detail in the shadows of your images. Too low a gamma number and you will certainly see most of the shadow highlights, but your colors will be de-saturated and icky. Some prefer a gamma of 1.8, and others prefer a gamma of 2.2. I suggest, if you understand how to create different profiles in Spyder2PRO and other calibration software programs, you experiment and create different gamma profiles. But remember, you have to be consistent across your workflow or you will have some crazy images coming out of your printer!

Spyder2Pro Senses Adobe Gamma

Select Response Curve

After you choose your custom gamma number, you can move on, or go one step further and design your own Tone Response, which tends to alter the middle and quarter tones of an image.

Spyder2Pro Senses Adobe Gamma

Choosing either Cineon or Linear Grayscale brings up the respective type of graph:

Spyder2Pro Response Curve Graph - Response Curves

There are several options available here, such as defining 1-9 points on the graph, displaying and selecting Global (which is all three color channels), or the Red, Green, and Blue channels individually. You can also display Target, Calibrated, Uncalibrated, or Correction in any particular order to display on the graph. Showing all of them results in an interesting display of just what Spyder2PRO has done with the calibration in comparison to your previous settings. A nice little goldmine of information can be found here.


Home Reviews Forums News 2015 2013 2012 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004
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Articles Archived Websites (Pre-DigitalDingus): D100 Lounge E-10 Club | Contact