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Digital Photography Definitions (I to L)


Below are definitions to many terms which come up when reading digital camera reviews and discussions of digital photography in general.

.........Term........ Definition
IEEE1394 See Firewire
Infinity Focus setting of a lens, where the lens gives a sharp image of very distant objects.
Interpolation Artificially increasing resolution. Interpolation software takes a given pixel and/or area, and "guesses" at what the pixel or area would look like at a higher resolution. It's not TRUE resolution, and is certainly not perfect, but does help in some cases if the original image file was of high-quality to begin with. Some are very good while others are just terrible. In any case, be very careful of camera manufacturers who claim they interpolate their resolution in order to obtain the same pixel count as a higher megapixel camera. There is NO SUBSTITUTE for TRUE resolution.
IS
(Canon)
Image Stabilization. This is Canon's term for a lens which uses "vibration-detecting gyro sensors" to move the image-stabilizing lens group in parallel, counter-acting Camera Shake, so that you get a blur-free image when taking photos at low-shutter speeds.
ISO Equivalent measurement of ASA of film. It's a measurement on digital cameras, of how sensitive to light the imager is. The higher the ISO number, the higher the sensitivity to light. This is great for low-light events, where you want to take images, but don't have as much light as you would like. However, as you probably know or have heard, higher ISO levels mean higher noise levels as well. This is where high-end and professional cameras fair better than others. This also has to do with larger pixel sizes, too. The larger the pixel, the more sensitive to light it is and the lower noise it will have.
Jaggies aka, Pixelization. This refers to a pattern in an image which many refer to as "Stair-Stepping", where the image shows signs of stair-stepped lines around the borders and outlines within an image. The Jaggie term is used when discussing low-resolution images because you often see them in an unmistakable stepped appearance, but do note, they can also be seen in high-resolution images as well. Jaggies are not an exclusive indicator of low-resolution images.
JPEG Joint Photographic Experts Group; JPG; .jpg. JPEG is an image standards committee which formed a standard in image compression. This compression has an algorhythm, which gives the end-user a balance between quality of the image and a compressed image. For example, on most digital cameras, a JPEG compression ratio of 1:4 (JPEG FINE in Nikon cameras) yields a high-quality image, while a 1:16 compression (JPEG BASIC in Nikon cameras) results in a photo that has noticeable compression artifacts and is not recommended for printing but merely for web use. If you want to compress your JPEGs even further or more precisely for your particular need, it can be done in a photo editor, such as Photoshop.

Home Reviews Forums News 2013 2012 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004
RSS Feeds FOV Factor Table Sensor Sizes | Definitions: A-D E-H I-L M-P Q-U V-Z | Sitemap
Articles Archived Websites (Pre-DigitalDingus): D100 Lounge E-10 Club | Contact