Fujitsu DynaMO 2300U2 2.3GB

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Fujitsu DynaMO 2300U2
Why MO?
November 9, 2005
Introduction The 2300U2 Why MO? Data Security Specifications Conclusion


Let's discuss a little further on why the computer user should use the 2300U2 and MO technology.

Why Use The 2300U2

Obviously, you can't backup your entire hard drive. However, this is not what the 2300U2 is designed for. It is designed for safe, reliable, and secure incremental backups of typical file sizes which you deem important, and use on a regular basis. Incremental backups are more reliable than transferring an entire hard drive because with large capacity transfers, you don't know which files are corrupt. I can say this from first-hand experience. What usually happens, is files are put on the hard drive, and then forgotten until needed. And if you don't need the files anymore, they just sit there. In some cases, for years. Which brings me to my next subject: outdated information.

Outdated Information

If you're the average computer user, you probably have hundreds of megabytes of data on your hard drive which aren't used anymore. And for many, we're talking gigabytes of useless data. Outdated information does not only take up space it doesn't have to, but it's also dangerous. The reason is due to corrupt files being created when you use your hard drive. Every single time your hard drive spins, ALL the data on the drive has the chance of losing information. Repeated access to a particular location on the drive will speed up this possibility. Hard drives are reliable. No doubt about it. However, when we begin to discuss years worth of data just sitting on a drive, not only will the older files become potentially corrupt, but your new data will be fragmented.

"Storageflow"

You've heard of workflow in the computer world, but I would like to introduce a new term called Storageflow. What is it? Well, it's what I define as the process of backing up your data and valuable information. Previously, it was briefly mentioned having too many forms of proprietary storage could neutralize the benefits of reliable storage without a storage plan in place. So, let's discuss how to properly setup a multiple-level data storage routine. Currently, you have about 2GB of data storage per disk, for a 2300U2 model (2.3GB initially but after formatting, you have 2.02GB), which should satisfy most file size requirements.

  • Identify which files on your computer are the most valuable and important to you
  • Prioritize those important files
  • Backup the important files
Having the Fujitsu 2300U2 attached to your computer, you now backup those files to disk which have been identified and prioritized. The amount of backups should be related to a time period. I recommend rotating a collection of disks every month, and burning the files on DVD. What your storageflow technique might comprise of, is having two hard drives, a Fujitsu 2300U2, and a CD/DVD burner. I can tell you from the start, the 2300U2 is the LAST piece of equipment which will fail. Your hard drive is #1 on the list. And the media which data is burned onto can be defective as well, so be sure to buy the higher quality media.

Why Not Use Another Hard Drive For Backup?

Using another hard drive for backing up files is a good idea. In fact, I recommend that too. However, as person who currently runs 4 hard drives on their computer, I can say this solves part of the problem, but not all of it. Incremental backups to another form of storage medium, is the best way.


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