Silverstone FP52

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Pioneer DVR-111DBK
Conclusion
September 20, 2006
DVR-111DBK Introduction DVR-111DBK: A Closer Look DVR-111DBK: Benchmarks
DVR-111DBK Specs DVR-111DBK Conclusion


Pros

  • Easy installation
  • Windows XP Pro recognizes drive as DVR-111D without any drivers
  • Burns some media (i.e., Matrix) that other DVD drive companies (i.e., LG Electronics) just don't accept
  • Stable burns
  • Basic design which is very uncomplicated
  • Possibly the most affordable DVD drive available which offers solid quality and reliability
Cons
  • None observed
Observations
  • Accepts a wide variety of media
Suggestions
  • SATA version of the DVR series
  • LightScribe support (probably not likely due to HP's licensing but who knows)
I was asking myself while typing up this review: What makes the Pioneer DVR series so successful? The answer was right in front of me. I previously owned a DVR-105D as I sold it and purchased a DVR-107D; currently own a DVR-109DBK, and just recently purchased a DVR-111DBK. The 107D in my older Abit VP6 mobo, is doing just great and I have had ZERO problems with it. I estimate the amount of DVD and CD burns to be around 1800-2000. The DVR-109DBK has exhibited no problems, and finally, the DVR-111DBK has done just fine recording some movies and creating test discs for this review.

By the time I finish this review, I'm sure a DVR-112D will be announced! That's the nature of DVD writers. And since the DVR-111 series was announced in January 2006, a DVR-112 is sure to be waiting in the wings.

The DVR-111DBK produced stable burns on not only single-layer but DVD+R DL media as well. Some people avoid Pioneer because they do not support booktyping. I really don't find this to be an issue, and it may come as a suprise to some, but most DVD players sold these days are manufactured to accept DVD media that is not "booktyped". Bitsetting was more popular several years ago when most DVD players were not created for DVD multi-media. Today, you just don't have that problem, so I'm still scratching my head on why booktyping is still preferred. In my opinion, if the DVD drive supports it, then great. If it does not, then well, that's great too. This will probably sound familiar from my LG GSA-5169 Review when talking about Mt. Rainier. Mt. Rainier and Booktyping are the last of the "necessary" features in my book.

Overall, I must give the Pioneer DVR-111DBK, a

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED PLUS

Since this is just an OEM drive with no additional software to review, the HR+ rating has everything to do with the hardware and functionality of the unit. And of course, the hardware performed just fine. I did seem to notice the drive is just a tad bit quieter than the DVR-109D I own. Unfortunately, I don't own a DVR-110D (or maybe some of us say fortunately since the DVR-110D had some major issues with burning) so I can't say if it's any difference. However, I suspect many own DVR-109 and previous models. Is upgrading to a DVR-111 worth it? Absolutely.


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