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D100 Review (Updated April 3, 2003)
Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5 | Page 6 | Page 7

D100 Review - Page 2

D100 FPS (Frames Per Second)

The Frames Per Second on your D100, depends dramatically on how much light is getting into your camera, and what shooting mode the camera is in (i.e., Program, Shutter, Aperture, and Manual).

I noticed that shooting in broad daylight, I was getting the expected speed, however, towards the end of the day, when there was less light available, the FPS dropped to 2fps and sometimes even 1fps. Now, ISO settings and shutter speeds have a lot to do with these results. If the camera doesn't think it can take a photo, then it will need time to think. So, in order to get the maximum FPS, you must have the camera on Manual. Obviously, you better know what your doing, or you will have a nice collection of photos that will need to be deleted.

If you have your D100 in full auto mode, this explains why you are getting a lower FPS. So, you must have sufficient light to get the maximum FPS, or, you must have your camera set on Manual, which overrides the "I need time to think" mode (i.e., Auto mode) of the D100. Generally speaking, keep your D100 shutter speed around 1/250sec or more to get the full Frames-Per-Second.

Focusing - Why Is My Photo Blurred?

I'm not going to recite the previous reasons on the first page just yet. Here is one possibility that I encountered while shooting my first few photos. I went outside to my backyard, and fired a few rounds at some trees and a fence. Well, when I got inside and loaded them onto my computer, I noticed only the left side was in focus, and everything else was blurred. It took me a second (actually more), to figure out that my focusing points were adjusted wrong. The D100 has 5 AF points, and you can adjust to any one of those five. In my case, I inadvertently moved the arrow pad so that I moved the focus point to left. This meant that everything else would be OOF (Out Of Focus). Be sure to make note of your display on the D100. If you want auto Dynamic-Area AF (i.e., 5-area AF), then be sure it is on, and not single-area AF. And also, be sure your Arrow Pad is in the locked position, so don't mistakenly adjust your focus preference when in Single-Area AF. You can read more about these settings on pages 65-69 of your D100 manual.

Menu & Monitor buttons

Thom Hogan is keen on noticing that sometimes the Menu & Monitor buttons do not respond on the first touch. I have noticed that if you fully press in on the buttons, the menu and monitor come up everytime. However, it's when you push the buttons maybe 3/4 of the way in or so, that I notice the inconsistency. When you are out shooting photos, you really don't pay attention to how much pressure you are using. Not a big deal, but when you are shooting fast moving objects and want a quick preview before another potential shot, it could be irritating.

D100 Button Layout

I have to comment that the layout of the D100 is very comfortable for me. After having owned an Olympus E-10 previously, the button layout was a little scattered. Nothing so dire that I couldn't perform my shooting, but I was aware of it. With the D100, you have an "arrow pad" instead of the separate 4 arrow buttons that were on the E-10. Now, obviously some people are going to say I shouldn't be even comparing these two cameras, but there are several people who are upgrading from an E-10 and other non-interchangeable DSLRs, so I think this is worth mentioning.



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Articles Archived Websites (Pre-DigitalDingus): D100 Lounge E-10 Club | Contact