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BlueRay Technologies Pulls HD DVD Machinery
From Production Lines
February 18, 2008

Origin Of News Release: Spokane, WA
Original Release Date: February 18, 2008
Announcement: BlueRay Technologies is going Blu-ray

The only indie multi-format high definition disc pressing plant, BlueRay Technologies, will drop its HD-DVD lines without waiting for the widely-reported and anticipated announcement of Toshiba's retreat from HD-DVD.

"This is a victory for the consumers, who can now move in to the stunning high def disc world and build collections with confidence," said industry expert Erick Hansen, a DVD pioneer and chairman of Blue Ray Technologies. "Toshiba can take heart in that there is no shame: it was a battle well-fought and that they have several adaptable technologies and backup plans."

In fact, no orders had come in to the full-service disc manufacturer for HD-DVDs, even partial orders along with Blu-ray clients looking to service both markets, since November. The indie film companies that BRT serves had seen the death of the HD-DVD format long before last week's announcement that Walmart, Blockbuster and Netflix were dropping the format - and even before Warner Bros. announced in January at the CES show they were going Blu-ray only.

"This week we will dismantle our HD-DVD lines and will be adding new equipment to bolster our Blue-ray manufacturing," said Hansen explaining, "Despite our name and preference, we always offered HD-DVDs as a service to our customers. Now we will reconfigure part of that equipment to make DVDs and CDs," said Hansen. "The indie film companies moved quicker than the studios and gradually stopped mixed orders in favor of Blu-ray late last year."

Hansen explained "They preferred the larger capacity and full 1080p quality of the Blu-ray discs going forward. We saw this but since I have been saying HD-DVD was DOA for four years, we still had to wait for the industry to catch up to the inevitable. HD-DVD is dead, all that is left is the burial."

He said "We are waiting this week for the other shoes to drop from Universal and Paramount/DreamWorks, the last studios to support HD-DVD over Blu-ray -- and word from Microsoft, who used the now-obsolete format as an add-on to their Xbox game console."


February 18, 2008

Unfortunately, we see the kind of misinformation being distributed by BlueRay Technologies, as we have via other marketing outlets. Erik Hansen refers to HD DVDs in the third paragraph above, as not being capable of 1080p. Well, I have to respond to this by saying I have about 100 HD DVDs in my collection which are in fact, 1080p. And Erik refers to the larger capacity of Blu-ray discs as well, when we have several Blu-ray titles which do not use the all the capacity of the disc.

Further, as anyone familiar with High-Definition codecs are aware, capacity can vary, depending on an MPEG-2 codec and a VC-1 codec because of the larger space required for MPEG-2 codecs, found on Blu-ray discs. If this was simply a consumer stating this, I wouldn't be so amazed, but this is a CEO who distributes this kind of information, and unknowing consumers listen.

- DigitalDingus


News Source: http://www.prweb.com


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